At the outlet of the 60 km-long Muhazi Lake there is currently an earth fill dyke which is prone to overtopping or even complete collapse during the wet season. The dyke’s instability causes a potential hazard to inhabitants of the downstream Nyabugogo area, a commercial hub in Kigali town, which threatens lives and properties.

The project consisted of a feasibility and a design phase. For the project, a large number of field- and desktop-tasks were performed. Field-activities included a topographical survey of the project immediate area for design purposes, a detailed mapping of areas around the lake shore sensitive to changes in water level, and a Geotechnical investigation programme due to the complexities related to the peat-soils.

FutureWater conducted a full hydrological assessment of the Lake Muhazi catchment, including the study of flood flows to provide design values, considering climate change, and routing of the lake. Besides, a detailed water resources assessment was performed using WEAP and a study on the operational rule curves, future demands, among others.

Muhazi Lake and dam.

The outputs of this analysis fed directly into the design of the Dyke (serving as a dam): the dimensions and outlet structures, performed by the lead partner (Z&A). Besides the project included an Environmental and Social Impact Assessment

Stakeholders were involved actively during all phases of work and several training and capacity building activities were organized.

In an effort to introduce integrated land and water management within hydrological units (catchments), the Government of Rwanda, through Water for Growth Rwanda, has commenced the development of catchment plans. Water for Growth Rwanda, a platform to promote improved, integrated management of Rwanda’s water resources (IWRM), is supported by the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The overall aim of the program is to “effectively manage water resources to contribute to sustainable socio-economic development and equitably improved livelihoods”. Important components of the program are:

  • Research and capacity building on IWRM
  • Implementation of IWRM principles for shared learning in four Demonstration Catchments
  • The development of sustainable integrated water management plans
  • Creation of an IWRM Investment Fund, also open to other financial contributors

FutureWater and eLEAF possess unique expertise and knowledge to undertake such a project. Our approach is client-centered, and the proposed tools are carefully selected based on the ease of use, flexibility towards the availability of data and having a strong focus on future scenario development.

Many Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) planning projects fail as a clear future focus is lacking. By combining local data sets and data obtained from remote sensing in hydrological models, information on crop transpiration, groundwater flows, recharge and runoff can be obtained. WEAP incorporates these values into a practical tool for water resources planning and policy analysis. This results in a more complete knowledge base on water resources availability.

Demonstration catchments of Water for Growth Rwanda
Demonstration catchments of Water for Growth Rwanda.

First, Evapotranspiration (ET), Biomass Production (BP) and Biomass Water Productivity (BWP) maps will be produced for the whole country of Rwanda. After this, the WEAP framework will be used to develop four catchment models for the four demonstration catchments.

Subsequently, the WEAP framework will be used to develop for the entire country a water balance and water allocation tool. This WEAP-R will be used to evaluate various scenarios regarding water allocation. These models will be fed with data based on remote sensing, local data, and global data. The models will be setup for a 10 years’ reference and validation/calibration period (2006-2015) on a monthly base. For scenario analysis the models will be setup for a two 10 years’ period (2020 and 2050).

Lastly, training will be provided on using the four WEAP-C and WEAP-R models. The educational component will be integrated and will focus on enhanced understanding of the water balance and allocation issues.

 

The Nile Basin Decision Support System (NBI-DSS) will provide the necessary knowledge base and analytical tools to support the planning of cooperative joint projects and the management of the shared Nile Basin water resources on an equitable, efficient and sustainable manner. FutureWater was asked to support this NBI-DSS and to undertake preliminary data collection and compilation.

Details

The developed data base has two main components: spatial data and point data. Regarding the spatial data the following data have been made available

  • Land cover
  • Soils
  • Vegetation Indices
  • Precipitation FEWS

These data are available over the entire Nile Basin and include a extensive set of attributes. Data have been quality controlled and is ready to apply in the DSS and can be used for various types of hydrological models.

The point data includes over 20 million records from various sources included global and local data sets. Data are stored in PostGreSQL. The data can be considered as the most complete hydro-meteorological dataset available for the Nile so far.

The countries included in the Nile Equatorial Lake sub-basins face an ever increasing pressure on land and water resources, together with rapid population growth. As a result, food production is one of the main concerns and priorities of policymakers in the area. Irrigation and improved water resources management have the potential to boost agricultural productivity in the area, currently almost entirely rainfed. Irrigated crop yields are much higher than rainfed yields, which means that there is a high potential to increase food production in the area.

FutureWater, in collaboration with WaterWatch, will assess the irrigation potential of seven Nile countries in order to fill gaps in the NBI and member country information based on agricultural use. This study consists of several consecutive steps, in which hydrological modelling, the use of remote sensed data, ArcGIS analyses, consultation workshops and meetings form the core of the project.

The specific objectives of this project are:

  • Determine the irrigation potential of the proposed countries considering the physical resources of ‘soil’ and ‘water’, combined with the irrigation water requirements as determined by the cropping patterns and climate
  • Provide a preliminary assessment of probable environmental and socio-economic constraints to be considered to ensure sustainable use of physical resources within the Nile basin
  • Indicate the required resources for the preparation and investment phase

NEL countries

Maps

The assessment of the Irrigation Potential study resulted in a irrigation suitability map. This map can be downloaded as jpeg or as GeoTIFF. Click on the links below to download the suitable format: